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Customer Builds

Hey all, we have now starting to put together a customer build page where we've put up pictures of what our customers have done with the kit they brought from us. It might give you a bit of a helping hand in some design ideas, or just get you excited about your build.

Click here to see the rest of the builds

craftedarcades crate

A Little Inspiration For Your Own Arcade Machine!

A Little Inspiration For Your Own Arcade Machine!

It has never been easier to build an arcade machine and here at DIY Arcade we have all the things that you need to get up and running. We have the joysticks, buttons and Jamma boards that have thousands (yes we do have a Jamma board with over 2000 games on it!) and everything else you would need to bring your childhood memories of standing in an arcade into your own game room in your own house!

To get you inspired I have had a look around the internet and found some really cool home arcade designs that other people have done! I have found a couple that really look cool with one celebrating 80’s arcade gaming and the other one celebrating the 90’s.

Xevious: Bar Top 80’s Style Arcade

home arcade

http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,92656.160.html

Now this one here is really cool and it does a great job in showing how you can have a home arcade, but without having to take up a ton of space. You see these bar top machines look really cool sitting on a desk in a game room or even in the living room (just check with your wife first guys!) and they really do scream 80’s! One other really cool thing about this is the way that the guy who made it has done a great job in getting some truly amazing custom art work for his cab. You see that is one of the cool things about designing your own arcade cabinet. You can put your own artwork on the side to celebrate your favourite game in this guy’s case it was Xevious, but no matter what you are into there is just a ton of custom art work out there for pretty much every game. Here at DIY Arcade we have all the joysticks, buttons, speakers and parts you need to build the guts of an arcade machine just like this one!

Street Fighter Arcade: Stand Up 90’s Style Arcade

home arcade

http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,84649.120.html

Many people when making a home arcade these days will go for the same kind of button set up that this gentleman has gone for here. You see this way even if you are playing a very early game from the 80’s that just requires one button you know that this button set up will work. And speaking of buttons how nice and clean do those buttons and joysticks that the guy used look on this cab? Well we have pretty much the exact same ones here at DIY Arcade. The main thing that grabs your attention about this cab is the amazing art work that has gone into it. A home arcade is more about just playing the games from your childhood it’s about celebrating gaming and by putting your favourite game on the side of your cab you are certainly doing that. This guy has one of the most amazing pieces of Street Fighter artwork I have ever seen on his joystick/button panel! A home arcade that looks like this is far more than just a machine to play the old classics on it’s a real statement and can be the main attraction of your game room, heck even your whole house!

Take Your Home Arcade To The Next Level With A Track Ball

Take Your Home Arcade To The next Level With A Track Ball

While when making your dream home arcade machine a track ball may be low on your list of priorities. At the end of the day adding a track ball to your arcade is actually pretty easy to do and it will not break the bank either. The track ball these days is some people think is just something of a forgotten thing. But while the track ball is seen as something that was just in the 80’s, arcade games that made use of a track ball have been being made well into the 00’s. Anyway let’s take a look at why track balls are awesome..

The Origins Of Track Ball Games

What the first actual arcade track ball game is, is actually something  that is still debated to this day. Atari released a game in 1978 simply called Football which is often regarded as the first game to have a track ball or as Atari called it Trak-Ball! But it has been said, rumoured for years that Atari actually copied the idea from a Japanese soccer game which was made by Taito and released a little while earlier.

Track Ball In The 80’s

track ball

When you think of track ball games the early ones that will probably pop into your mind are games like Centipede, Missile Command and Marble Madness. These were arcade games in the 80’s that made just great use of the track ball and games like Marble Madness for example would have people standing at an angle slapping that track ball with everything they had trying not to let their marble fall of the level. Many of these games would be ported to home systems and as a result home consoles of the era such as the Atari 2600, 5200 and the ColecoVision would have track ball accessories released for them as there were multiple arcade games that made use of the track ball released each year.

Track Ball In The 90’s

track ball

While not as many games would make use of the track ball in the 1990’s there still were a handful of games released during the 1990’s. The Golden Tee Golf series started in 1990 and still to this day can be found in many arcades and sports bars all over the world. The action/strategy game Rampart was also released in the early 90’s and made great use of the track ball. One of the most interesting games to be released using the track ball was SegaSonic The Hedgehog which was released in 1993 and was a Sonic The Hedgehog game that made great use of the track ball.

Track Ball Now!

track ball

While the arcade scene as a whole is not what it once was there still have been a few track ball games that have made it into arcades the last few years. The Simpsons Bowling was a very popular bowling game made by Konami that was released in 2000 and worked wonderfully well with the track ball. The Golden Tee series even got a few new games in the 00’s. So while there may not be a new track ball game released each year. It’s cool to see that some developers still are willing to make track ball games.

Here At DIY Arcade we have two amazing track ball options for you guys to look at. We have a regular sized 3 inch track ball that can really make your home arcade look unique and bring back those memories you have of playing Centipede as a kid in your local arcade. But we also have a very reasonably priced smaller track ball that will work amazingly well, but not take up a ton of space.

Pushing Your Buttons

Pushing Your Buttons

While these days in the home our console controllers have just a ton of buttons on them. Back when arcades were the king and the main way people experienced video games the button layout of arcades was actually very simple. As the years progressed arcade games would get more and more complex and would require more buttons in order to make the games work properly.

These days when you are building a home arcade machine. It is highly likely that you will go for that six button, Street Fighter II style layout of arcade buttons. As this pretty much covers you for the majority of arcade games that have been released over the years. Although sometimes if you have your home arcade machine focused on just 80’s games then you many want to go for a more basic three button layout on your cabinet.

Looking back we can see how the button layout on arcade machines has changed over the years.

1 and 2 Button Games

When we look back at games like Space Invaders and Donkey Kong they would just need the one button to let you shoot or jump. This was the case for many arcade games in the early 80’s and truth be told for more than a few as the 80’s drew to an end. For many of these classic old school games, a joystick and just one button were more than enough.

Pushing Your Buttons

Two button games started to get really popular when games would be made where you would need a character to both jump and have some kind of attack. Arcades would most of the time come in two ways when it came to two button machines. You would have your arcade machines that would have the two buttons side by side, but you would also have some arcade machines that would have the buttons in slightly different positions.

3 and 4 Button Games

There are some arcade games that do offer a three button arcade cabinet, but these are really far more uncommon than the two button games. Most of the time these three button arcade cabinets were Jamma cabinets where an arcade could easily swap one game out with another and having that extra button covered them in case a future game would need a third button. As far as four button arcade cabinets go we are talking about gaming juggernauts SNK. Their arcade machines made great use of their 4 button system something that they would use as long as they made arcade machines!

The 6 Button Layout

These days thanks to Street Fighter most home arcades will have that six button layout with three buttons on top and three at the bottom. Having a six button layout on your arcade machine makes it so you can play all of the fighting games no matter who they are from. And while the button layout may be a little different at least you are able to play them and execute all of the moves.

Pushing Your Buttons

Konami & Midway

We already talked about how SNK liked to use the same button layout, but other studios would also like to use the same button layout on multiple machines. Konami would also do this for many of their arcade cabinets. For example their side scrolling beat em up games like Ninja Turtles, Simpsons, Buck O Hare and so on all use that same staggered two button layout.

Pushing Your Buttons

Midway created an interesting five button lay out that they would use for their Mortal Kombat game. Although when Mortal Kombat 3 was released a 6th button was added. Midway would also use this same button layout for a few of their other games such as WWF Wrestlemania, War Gods and even when Mortal Kombat went 3D with Mortal Kombat 4.

Customise Your Home Arcade Button Layout

Here at DIY Arcade we have a tremendous selection of arcade buttons for you guys to make your home arcade machine fit your style. We have your standard buttons in a variety of colours to fit your cabinet, but if you want to spice things up then check out our cool illuminated buttons. And if you want to really make your machine pop then try out our chrome plated illuminated buttons!

 

 

Knowing About Joysticks

Knowing About Joysticks

Rather than talking about a specific arcade game, today we are going to look at what we use to play the games and by that we mean joysticks. We know about a thing or two about joysticks here at DIY Arcade so let’s take a little look back at some of the popular joystick designs that have been used in arcades over the years.

2 Way, 4 Way Or 8 Way Joystick

In the early days of arcade gaming most machines would one of these 2,3 or 4 way joysticks as standard. Although there actually would be a few games that would use just a 2 way arcade stick that would move from left to right, but for the most part it was a digital 4 or 8 way joystick that was used in games. A good example of a game with a 2 way joystick is the arcade game Defender. Where the joystick would only be used to move your spaceship up and down.

Knowing About Joysticks

4 way joysticks were very common and a game like Pac-Man is best played actually some people will go as far to say that it always should be played with a 4 way joystick only offering up, down, left and right movement. 8 way joysticks would be used for games that allowed for diagonal movement. Games such a scrolling fighting games like The Simpsons or a one on one fighter like Street Fighter II must use a 8 way joystick.

Compatibility Issues

Back in the day it was very common for an arcade to reuse an old arcade cabinet and just swap out the arcade board. So the game would use the same joystick and buttons. Sometimes this could cause a problem for example a game like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles allows for diagonal movement, but a 4 way joystick does not allow this. Using Pac-Man again as an example, when played with a 8 way joystick, Pac-Man can be very hard to control as the game has a hard time when you move from down to left in a circle motion or going from one direction to another. Sometimes an arcade would use these things called restrictor gates. This was most commonly used when putting a 4 way joystick game into a 8 way joystick cabinet and they would prevent the joystick from going in diagonal directions.

Knowing About Joysticks

East & Western Joystick Differences

There are two main kind of joysticks that are used for arcade machines. In the West the preferred joystick was that of a longer shaft with a baseball bat style top which is referred to as the bat-top joystick. In Japan though they preferred a rounded ball shaped top which is known as the ball-top. It was not uncommon to find ball-top machines in the West, but the preferred style was certainly the bat-top.

Knowing About Joysticks

Here at DIY Arcade we have a variety of different joysticks for you to customise your home arcade with. No matter if you want a standard, classic looking arcade stick or if you want something a little more “special” such as one of our fun looking illuminated joysticks. No matter what we have that perfect joystick for your arcade, different colours and sizes are available so no matter what your taste we have you covered. 

Mappy

Mappy

Year Of Release: 1983

Studio: Namco

Description

Mappy was developed by Namco and published by them in Japan, but in the West it would be Midway who would publish the game. Released in 1983 this was one of the earliest platform style games and one of the most popular games of its day especially in Japan. The hardware that ran the game was actually pretty advanced for the time and required Namco to make a modified version of the Namco’s Super Pac-Man Board to allow for the smooth horizontal scrolling in the game.

Mappy Year Of Release: 1983 Studio: Namco Description Mappy was developed by Namco and published by them in Japan, but in the West it would be Midway who would publish the game. Released in 1983 this was one of the earliest platform style games and one of the most popular games of its day especially in Japan. The hardware that ran the game was actually pretty advanced for the time and required Namco to make a modified version of the Namco’s Super Pac-Man Board to allow for the smooth horizontal scrolling in the game. The player controls Mappy who is a police mouse who needs to retrieve a whole bunch of stolen loot from a house that is overrun by the Meowky a gang of no good cat crooks who keep stealing stuff. There are five different kinds of loot that Mappy needs to find these are a radio, television, computer, Mona Lisa and a safe. They are worth different points values and if Mappy can get a matching pair of items then he will earn a score multiplier. Another way to get extra points is by finding the boss of the Meowky, Goro (no not the one from Mortal Kombat!) if he is hiding behind an item then you will get extra points for catching him. Mappy plays like a traditional platform game where you use the joystick to move him around and you also have an action button top open doors. Mappy can lose a life by being touched by one of the Meowky or by falling and not landing on a trampoline. Mappy can use trampolines to move up the level, but a trampoline can only be jumped on four times before it breaks. You can also get more points by taking down the Meowky. Mappy can do this by shutting or slamming the doors and by using special microwave doors that emit a ray, knocking down the cats! A level is cleared once Mappy has collected all of the loot on the level.  Current High Score: 1,277,410 by Greg R Bond Related Titles Mappy has a very strange set of home releases. Nintendo themselves would publish a version on the Famicom in Japan, but despite Mappy being a popular game it was never released for the NES. A few different home computers such as the MSX and a couple of Japanese PC’s would get a port of the game along with the Sega Game Gear. While many other popular arcade games of the 80’s would be ported to pretty much anything that was capable of playing a video game. For some odd reason this was not the case with Mappy.  While Mappy was popular in the West, it was much bigger in Japan. Resulting in there being sequels that never made it out of the country. In 1986 Hopping Mappy would be released into arcades in Japan. This game would still see Mappy the police mouse putting cats in their place, but this time he was on a pogo stick. In 1989, Namco released the very weird platform game, Mappy Kids for the Nintendo Famicom only in Japan. In this game, Mappy must prove he can be a good provider before his girlfriend will marry him……. We did say it was weird! Mappy is a game that has appeared in numerous arcade collections over the years. Such as Namco Classic Collection Vol. 1 on the Sony Playstation and as part of the Famicom Mini Series for the Game Boy Advance in Japan.

The player controls Mappy who is a police mouse who needs to retrieve a whole bunch of stolen loot from a house that is overrun by the Meowky a gang of no good cat crooks who keep stealing stuff. There are five different kinds of loot that Mappy needs to find these are a radio, television, computer, Mona Lisa and a safe. They are worth different points values and if Mappy can get a matching pair of items then he will earn a score multiplier. Another way to get extra points is by finding the boss of the Meowky, Goro (no not the one from Mortal Kombat!) if he is hiding behind an item then you will get extra points for catching him.

Mappy

Mappy plays like a traditional platform game where you use the joystick to move him around and you also have an action button top open doors. Mappy can lose a life by being touched by one of the Meowky or by falling and not landing on a trampoline. Mappy can use trampolines to move up the level, but a trampoline can only be jumped on four times before it breaks. You can also get more points by taking down the Meowky. Mappy can do this by shutting or slamming the doors and by using special microwave doors that emit a ray, knocking down the cats! A level is cleared once Mappy has collected all of the loot on the level.

Mappy

Current High Score: 1,277,410 by Greg R Bond

Related Titles

Mappy has a very strange set of home releases. Nintendo themselves would publish a version on the Famicom in Japan, but despite Mappy being a popular game it was never released for the NES. A few different home computers such as the MSX and a couple of Japanese PC’s would get a port of the game along with the Sega Game Gear. While many other popular arcade games of the 80’s would be ported to pretty much anything that was capable of playing a video game. For some odd reason this was not the case with Mappy.

While Mappy was popular in the West, it was much bigger in Japan. Resulting in there being sequels that never made it out of the country. In 1986 Hopping Mappy would be released into arcades in Japan. This game would still see Mappy the police mouse putting cats in their place, but this time he was on a pogo stick.

In 1989, Namco released the very weird platform game, Mappy Kids for the Nintendo Famicom only in Japan. In this game, Mappy must prove he can be a good provider before his girlfriend will marry him……. We did say it was weird!

Mappy is a game that has appeared in numerous arcade collections over the years. Such as Namco Classic Collection Vol. 1 on the Sony Playstation and as part of the Famicom Mini Series for the Game Boy Advance in Japan.

 

NBA JAM

NBA JAM

Year Of Release: 1993

Studio: Midway

Description

One of the biggest arcade hits of the 1990’s all over the world was the over the top 2 on 2 basketball arcade game, NBA JAM. The idea of NBA JAM was slightly based on Midway’s other popular basketball game Arch Rivals. Arch Rivals tried to keep the fun of basketball by keeping the excitement of the sport, but by stripping away the rules. NBA JAM would follow on from this trend and also make use of digitized character much like Midway’s other huge hit Mortal Kombat. Midway had to pay a hefty sum of $100 per arcade machine sold to the NBA to secure the licensing rights. Midway also promised the NBA that many features would be added to the game which were not. Of course when the game was a huge hit no one really cared.

NBA JAM

NBA JAM was one of the first licensed sports games to take full advantage of the license that it had. The game made use of actual NBA rosters from the 1992-1993 season and would have digitised likeness of the actual players. The thing that makes NBA JAM so poplar was the game play. Midway took everything that was fun about basketball and made it even better! As well as this they took away many of the “boring” rules such as travelling, fouls and other such stuff that slows down the game. In NBA JAM players could jump high above the rim and do incredible dunks. They could set the net on fire by hitting three shots in a row and they could even shove over players without having a foul called! NBA JAM was a game that was so much fun that even a person who had no prior knowledge of the game of basketball could have a great time with.

NBA JAM

NBA JAM was an absolute smash hit and many of the phrases that the game would shout made their way into the pop culture of the 90’s, phrases such as He’s On Fire and Boomshakalaka were two of the favourites. One interesting thing about NBA JAM is that the developers of the game nearly 20 years later admitted that the game was biased against the Chicago Bulls. Mark Turmel was the main man behind the game and was a diehard Detroit Pistons fan. So he made it so that the Chicago Bulls would always miss last second shots when they were playing against the Pistons.

NBA JAM

Current High Score: NA

Related Titles

NBA JAM would be ported to many of the home systems of the era such as the Super Nintendo and the Sega Mega Drive. The versions that would be released at home would feature slightly different rosters than what was featured on the arcades.

Midway would follow up NBA JAM with NBA JAM Tournament Edition which added more than a few new features to the game such as each team now having three players. While the game was still 2 on 2 you now could make a substitution at half time. As well as this there were many hidden Easter eggs in the game. Most famously were hidden Mortal Kombat characters. The NBA though did not like the violent Mortal Kombat game being associated with the NBA so later versions of the arcade machine had these taken out.

It was Acclaim who would port the NBA JAM games to the home consoles and through a somewhat weird series of events they wound up having the exclusive rights to make NBA JAM games. But this did not stop Midway!

Acclaim would try to take NBA JAM into the world  of 3D gaming with NBA JAM Extreme which was released to very poor reviews. Midway on the other hand kept modifying their NBA JAM game engine and statred the NBA Hangtime series.

Acclaim would try and make NBA JAM a full-fledged basketball sim with the game NBA JAM 99. This game was very poorly received with many people wondering why it had the NBA JAM name.

In 2010, EA Sports who now own the license to NBA JAM after Acclaim went out of business released a new version of NBA JAM for the Nintendo Wii. This version featured the same crazy over the top 2 on 2 action that NBA JAM was loved for and turned out to be a pretty big hit. It was such a big hit that EA Sports released an improved version called NBA JAM On Fire Edition for the Playstation 3 and Xbox 360 about a year later. 

Final Fight

Final Fight

Year Of Release: 1989

Studio: Capcom

Description

Released right at the end of 1989, Final Fight is one of Capcom’s most beloved arcade games. Interestingly though when the game was in early development it was being made as a sequel to their game Street Fighter. But because of the huge success of the game Double Dragon. Capcom decided that they wanted to make this new game a side scrolling beat em up as well. The guys behind Final Fight would later work on Street Fighter II and the link between Street Fighter and Final Fight is strengthened as some characters from the Final Fight series have also appeared in various Street Fighter games over the years.

Final Fight

Final Fight offers amazing production values and the game does have the look of a gritty action movie from the 80’s. The character sprites are much larger than what Double Dragon had and they are also better animated making them look far more realistic. Also the level design  is just amazing with each stage of the game having a very unique feel to it and with many things going on in the backgrounds. Capcom did a great job in not only making the characters feel like real people, but also making Metro City feel like a real place. The story of the game is that the city of Metro City is overrun by crime and the gang Mad Gear is the main force. Thankfully the newly elected mayor of the city, Mike Haggar has vowed to clean up crime and as he is a former pro wrestler he has the muscles to do this. In retaliation to this though, Mad Gear have kidnapped his daughter. It’s now up to Haggar, his daughter’s boyfriend Cody and Cody’s buddy Guy to get her back and put a stop to Mad Gear’s reign of terror on the city!

Final Fight

The game play is very satisfying with each of the three characters having their own range of attacks. You can do attacks such as punches and jumping attacks, but you can also walk into an enemy and unleash a grapple attack as well. In addition to this there are various weapons that you can pick up which can deal more damage to an enemy. One cool thing about Final Fight was the way that all of the enemies had their own energy bar so you knew how strong each foe you encounter was. Each level will see you need to take on a series of enemies before making your way to the boss. While Final Fight does offer three characters, this is actually a two player game.

Final Fight

Current High Score: NA

Related Titles

Final Fight would be a launch title for the Super Nintendo, but the version was rather watered down and had many things that Nintendo deemed offensive toned down or removed. First of all the game removed Guy only letting you play as either Haggar or Cody, but as well as this there was no two player option. Capcom would eventually release a new version on the Super Nintendo called Final Fight Guy which added in Guy, but at the expense of Cody!

US Gold would port Final Fight to pretty much every single home computer that was on the planet! Ranging from very basic versions of computers such as the ZX Spectrum to more powerful ones like the Commodore Amiga.

The best home version of Final Fight was not released until 1993 and this version was on the Sega Mega CD. This port was not done by Sega and is quite amazing in how close to the arcade it is. There was even some cheesy, but fitting voice acting added for this version of the game.

There would be two Super Nintendo exclusive sequels to Final Fight. Final Fight 2 was released in 1993 and would allow two players to play at once and also introduced two new characters Carlos and Maki along with the returning, Mike Haggar. Final Fight 3 would be released in 1995 and would see not only Haggar return, but also Guy and two new characters in Lucia and Dean. Its interesting that despite the immense popularity of the first Final Fight arcade game that the two sequels would only be released on console. Also with how much content is in Final Fight 2 and 3 you have to wonder why Capcom had such a hard time porting the first game to the Super Nintendo.

Final Fight would get a few spin offs over the years such as the NES release of Mighty Final Fight, and the one on one 3D fighting game Final Fight Revenge. Capcom tried to revive the series with Final Fight: Streetwise on the Playstation 2 and original Xbox in 2006, but it was not very well received. 

Marvel Super Heroes vs Street Fighter

Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter

Year Of Release: 1997

Studio: Capcom

Description

Capcom in many ways had revived the arcade scene with their huge hit Street Fighter II in the early 90’s. At the very least they changed the way one on one fighting games would be made. Before this game hit the arcade Capcom had three big hits on their hands with X-Men Children Of The Atom, Marvel Super Heroes and X-Men vs Street Fighter.  X-Men vs Street Fighter was a popular game, but it did have a few game play issues that did annoy more than a few people so as a result Capcom, refined the game play here and as a result it makes the game more enjoyable to play.

Marvel Super Heroes vs Street Fighter

Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter from a game play point of view is that of a tag team one on one fighter. You need to pick a team of two characters there is a great selection of Street Fighter characters and the Marvel side of thing is represented well also. Only Cyclops and Wolverine return from the previous game with the rest being all new characters. The game plays fast and furious and while on the surface it may lack the sophistication of Street Fighter it is actually a pretty deep fighting game engine that is here. But at the same time it’s very easy for a new player to just drop in enough money for one credit and have a little fun for five minutes.

Marvel Super Heroes vs Street Fighter

The game sees you needing to beat a series of other teams of characters before you make it to the boss. The boss in the game is Marvel super villain Apocalypse and it will be both of your characters against him on his own. Apocalypse though has created a cyber Akuma that you also need to face off against! The game looks great, but not a great deal has changed over X-Men vs Street Fighter, with many of the same backgrounds used just with a palate swap when it comes to the colours.

Marvel Super Heroes vs Street Fighter

Current High Score: NA

Related Titles

Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter would be ported to both the Playstation and the Sega Saturn. Interestingly though both versions are different. The Sega Saturn version makes great use of the 4mb expansion cartridge to give a near arcade perfect experience. Unfortunately the Sega Saturn version of the game was only released in Japan.

The Sony Playstation version of the game is very different. While it features the same characters as the Sega Saturn version of the game. Due to the limitations of the console when it comes to 2D fighters this version of the game does not have the tag team aspect. Instead it plays more like a traditional 2 out of 3 rounds Street Fighter game. But unlike the Sega Saturn version, this version would be released all over the world and not just in Japan.

After this game, Capcom would have phenomenal success with their Marvel vs Capcom series of games. Starting with Marvel vs Capcom: Clash Of Superheroes in 1998 in arcades and then on the Sony Playstation & Sega Dreamcast.

Marvel vs Capcom 2: New Age Of Heroes would be released in 2000 in arcades and also for the Sega Dreamcast, Sony Playstation 2 and the original Xbox. The game would also later be ported to the Xbox Live arcade and the iOS store as well.

The most recent game in the series is Marvel vs Capcom 3: Fate Of Two Worlds which was released for the Playstation 3 and the Xbox 360 in 2011 this game would not see an arcade release. Later the same year Capcom would release Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom once again for the Playstation 3, Xbox 360 and this time there was also a version for the Playstation Vita.

 

 

Burger Time

BurgerTime

Year Of Release: 1982

Studio: Data East

Description

Released in 1982 by Data East, well actually while it was Data East who made the game, in the USA it would actually be Midway who would publish the game to the arcades. BurgerTime is seen as one of the classics of early 80’s gaming and is still a very popular game in the competitive gaming scene today. The game was originally going to be called the very generic sounding, Hamburger, but shortly before it was released the name was changed to BurgerTime.

Burger Time

Like many popular arcade games of the early 80's BurgerTime is a game that makes use of just a single screen for each level. The story of the game is that you play the role of Peter Pepper and you want to make the world’s greatest burgers, there are all these “evil” foods who want to stop you from doing this. Truth be told, BurgerTime like many other early 80’s arcade was not popular because of its story it was the fun and addictive game play that kept people playing. And it was the fun and intriguing art work on the marquee and the side of the arcade cabinet that would bring people over to the machine in the first place.

Burger Time

Each screen of BurgerTime has a burger bun top and a burger bun bottom at the top and bottom of the screen. In between the two are numerous parts of a burger, meat patties, lettuce and tomatoes. You control Peter Pepper and need to have him walk along the full length of an ingredient to make it drop down. You do this until the burger has been made and once all the burgers have been made and fall to the plates at the bottom of the screen the level is done. To make things tougher though you need to avoid or kill Mr Egg, Mr Pickle and Mr Hot Dog.

Burger Time

The way that you kill the enemies depends on how high of a score you are going to get. One way you can kill them is to drop a burger ingredient onto them. Once they are killed they disappear, but they do re spawn a short while later. The other and way to score more points by taking care of an enemy is to make them drop. To do this you need to lure them behind you and have them follow you onto one of the ingredients as you cross it. It will drop taking them with you, give you a higher score and your ingredient will drop an extra place.

Current High Score: 11,512,500 by Bryan L Wagner

Related Titles

BurgerTime was insanely popular and as a result many of the consoles and the home computers of the era would get a port of the game. Atari 2600, ColecoVision and even the NES would get versions of BurgerTime released for them. The Nintendo Game Boy would get a special version of the game which was called BurgerTime Deluxe.

There was a spin off game released called Peter Pepper's Ice Cream Factory, but this game would not reach the same heights that BurgerTime did. A true sequel called Super BurgerTime would be released which let you play as Peter Pepper Jr and featured many improved elements such as vastly improved graphics, new game play ideas and a two player option. Another game in the series called PizzaTime was scheduled for release sometime in 1983-84, but due to the video game crash the game was cancelled.

A game called Diner was released in 1984, exclusively for the Intellivision home console and is a sequel to BurgerTime. Diner was never released for any other system and as a result is one of the most highly sought after games on the Intellivision.

BurgerTime is still very relevant to this day and has been included in many different arcade compilation games. Also in 2007, Namco would release a new version of BurgerTime called BurgerTime Delight for the iOS store. The most recent BurgerTime game was BurgerTime World Tour which was a downloadable title for the Xbox 360, Playstation 3, Nintendo Wii and the PC as well.